York Top // Seamwork Magazine

Collage 2016-07-19 18_03_00

It’s the first time in a long time that I’ve been inspired to blog post. Maybe it’s because I tend to knit more these days than work on other crafts, of course I have my podcast and Ravelry as my main platforms to share all that. I decided if I’m going to continue my sewing adventure then I should share my more detailed progress here and make truly good use of my blog.

Above are a selection of photos I took of my most up to date progress on my current sew work in progress. It’s the York Top by Seamwork Magazine, I got this pattern free and I found it via a post on Pinterest sharing it’s availability.

 sw3026-york-01-large-a2ce23e68db977cd5885c766335f40baf37c92638d6e14509e982b8d99d50eba

Given the information on the pattern to use a light to medium weight fabric I chose medium weight cotton. Thus far I can already tell it’s more suited to a lighter weight fabric with more drape. I’m a newbie sewer and we learn as we go but it all seems glaringly obvious to me now; my bust is larger than the model and secondly the medium weight fabric is hanging off them like a sack of potatoes. As seen above in the right photo.

I’m not sure this pattern really is for me or my shape after I’ve gotten halfway through the sewing, so I’m going to make a few alterations in hope of making a more ‘me’ styled garment that I will wear and feel comfortable in.

  1. First thing to think about is altering the fitting of the top, especially under the bust and maybe add in some waist darts into the front and back to remove some of that excess unwanted fabric.
  2. The length of the overall garment is too long and with it being a fabric with lots of drape I think it could be cinched up so it rests nicely around my jeans pocket.
  3. The sleeves they bother me a little, they seem too long and wide to what I like. I think a shorter above elbow sleeve without the cuffs to give it a more delicate balance and maybe just a binding edge like the neck line. I may even alter my seam allowance to taper the sleeves in a little more.

What do you think?

I certainly don’t want to waste a garment so adapting it is my next option, which is one of the great parts of knitting and sewing your own clothing you can change something to your shape and style.

Overall I’m happy with my sewing. I’ve done darts previously on my Ruby Dress, which I will share another day and those were no real struggle. What was new to me was adding in set-in sleeves. I’ve added set-in sleeves before where knitwear’s concerned so I understand how to ease in the sleeve to the armhole but sewing in the sleeve is slightly different and so very interesting; it wasn’t half as hard as I was first expecting which was a nice surprise.

Creating two lines of ease stitching around the bell curve of the sleeve head you then tug them slightly till the notches match. So my method was to pin the centre point of the curve on the sleeve head to the centre of the shoulder. Then I pinned a little around the top curve of the sleeve head to keep it sturdily in position. This helped for when I needed to pull on those ease stitches so it was kept firmly in place. Then I placed the side edges of the sleeve and armhole together and pinned to the edge of the notch, this gave me a clear view of how much I needed to ease in the sleeve head. I then cinched in the sleeve head till it fit nicely by tugging on both ends of the ease stitching (make sure to leave long ends) and pinned the remaining sleeve head in position. Then with my seam ripper I unpicked both lines of ease stitching and my sleeve head was proudly in place.

Like Magic!!

Next Time // I’ll let you know how I get on with my alterations and see some further progress.

You can like me on Bloglovin to follow future posts or follow here plus you can also follow my podcast ‘Killtocraft Podcast’ on youtube where I share all things knitty, sewing, spinning and more of me! Thank you for popping by.

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